+44 207 650 7819

info@imagistlondon.com

Imagist is a design studio based in London. We work with world-class companies to primarily create visual identities, but also books, print campaigns, websites, record sleeves and wayfinding. While we wouldn't call ourselves strategists, we do help companies and individuals define their message and personality along with developing a visual expression of their identity.

 

 

Imagist has been described as “a design studio with a fine art sensibility”. Established in 2004, the studio has gained an international reputation for imaginative, thoughtful design.

 

Our work, led by rigorous research, is not constrained by a house style, nor is it trend-led. We collaborate closely with our clients to create something completely individual for each brief. We are passionate about what we do, and take pride in the quality of our craft and the long-standing relationships with our clients, who include:

Amos Goldreich

Anthony Mascolo

Asian Dub Foundation

Ashiyana

Atticus Finch

Berkeley Group

Blackfinch

Bloomsbury

Carousel

Carinthia West

Catharyne Ward

Centrepoint

Charcoalblue

ChilliBean

Denmoor

Dillwyn Smith

EADS

Eddisons

Futurecity

Goehuis & Co.

Grand Visual

Hemsley + Hemsley

 

Inition

Keelvar

Led Bib

Match & Fuse

Mind

NetJets

NasJet

Nike

OneDeko

Old Spitalfields Market

PhotoVoice

Pip MacCallum

Positive Group

Rise

Sacca

Silk + Honey

Spitalfields Music

St James

Tate

The Library Space

Unilever

Zuhause

Imagism was an early 20th-century poetry movement that championed precision of imagery and clear, sharp language. As a poetic style, it gave Modernism its start in the early 20th century. The group started with long poems or passages of text and removed 'every word that did not contribute' to produce the most succinct expression possible. The most famous example comes from one of the founders, Ezra Pound, entitled 'In a Station of the Metro', which simply reads:

 

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;

Petals on a wet, black bough.

 

This approach resonated with our way of working – taking a thorough, expanded brief, and removing everything that did not contribute, so as to produce the most succinct expression of the message.

 

This is why we're called Imagist.

We regularly undertake studio projects, setting a brief for ourselves internally with an aim to developing solutions that are unusual or thought-provoking. This process allows us to research areas we wouldn't normally be exposed to, develop new techniques for coming up with ideas, or just to work on something purely creative for its own sake.

 

Here is a selection from the last ten years:

Title: Cloudbusting (2008)

Inspired by the Kate Bush song, ‘Cloudbusting’ from her 1985 album, ‘Hounds of Love’. We researched the subject of the track, Austrian psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich, who said he could produce rain by manipulating what he called ‘orgone energy’, a hypothetical universal life force. Through the use of the cloudbuster, Reich believed he could influence the weather by altering levels of atmospheric orgone.

 

At the time of the project (early 2009), recession-led negative feeling was rife in Europe, so we proposed a set of 'cloudbusting’ billboards to manipulate public feeling and promote a positive message: the sun will come out tomorrow.

Title: Occupancy and Displacement (2009)

Inspired by our trip to Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris, we produced three solutions based on the title ‘Occupancy and Displacement’. This solution explores displaced evidence of occupancy found in South London.

Title: Occupancy and Displacement (2009)

Inspired by our trip to Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris, we produced three solutions based on the title ‘Occupancy and Displacement’. This solution explores displaced evidence of occupancy found in South London.

Title: Occupancy and Displacement (2009)

Inspired by our trip to Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris, we produced three solutions based on the title ‘Occupancy and Displacement’. This solution explored the ideas of state/nationhood, and in turn investigated Sealand, an unrecognised micronation located on HM Fort Roughs in the North Sea.

Title: Occupancy and Displacement (2009)

Inspired by our trip to Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris, we produced three solutions based on the title ‘Occupancy and Displacement’. This solution was inspired by the tram system in Geneva. These little signs are hung from tram lines throughout the city. They are reminiscent of smiley faces, but are neither happy nor sad. They seem to suggest you shouldn't feel either emotion, but just be content in the fact that you are going somewhere.

Title: London Fruit and Wool Exchange (2011)

Following the announcement of the closure of the London Fruit and Wool Exchange, we did a visual documentation of the entire building, which housed our studio for nearly three years.

Title: Pen and Glue (2010)

We were each given a ballpoint pen and a glue stick as the brief. This solution shows the entire contents of the pen, followed by the entire contents of the glue stick on one piece of paper.

Title: The Rules (2008)

One

Exploit your lack of power

Two

Give a feeling of suspense

Three

Imagine what your worst enemy thinks is wrong with your work and play it up

Four

Read up on it

Five

Change your clothes

 

Title: The Rules (2008)

We asked friend and client, Colin Ledwith, to give us a set of rules to define this studio project. He chose five random cards from ‘Oblique Strategies’ by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt. You will find the selected rules under the opposite image.

 

Title: The Rules (2008)

For the solution to the brief, we explored whether our work, or how we worked together, would be in any way affected by what we wore. Over five days we each wore the same type of clothing, or a similar object (such as a badge or hat). We found that wearing the same ‘uniform’ gave us a feeling of belonging or unity. We found that wearing aprons made us feel more ‘crafty’, and wearing suits more ‘business-like’.

 

Title: The Rules (2008)

For the solution to the brief, we explored whether our work, or how we worked together, would be in any way affected by what we wore. Over five days we each wore the same type of clothing, or a similar object (such as a badge or hat). We found that wearing the same ‘uniform’ gave us a feeling of belonging or unity. We found that wearing aprons made us feel more ‘crafty’, and wearing suits more ‘business-like’.

 

Title: Snow (2007)

Having been snowed into the studio for the day, we took the opportunity to explore how we could use the situation to our advantage. Here’s an example of type in snow.

 

Title: Survival Kit (2009)

Most of our clients were going through a pretty rough time during the recession, so we thought the most practical Christmas gift would be to give them a Survival Kit, which included all the basics – food, drink, light and heat (in the form or matches and a candle) and design (obviously). It included a voucher for £50 off their next bill.

Title: Survival Kit (2009)

Most of our clients were going through a pretty rough time during the recession, so we thought the most practical Christmas gift would be to give them a Survival Kit, which included all the basics – food, drink, light and heat (in the form or matches and a candle) and design (obviously). It included a voucher for £50 off their next bill.